Mammillaria nejapensis Common Name: Silver Arrows

Translate This Page

Mammillaria nejapensis - My Cactus Plants Common Names: Silver Arrows, Owl Eyes .

MyCactusPlants.com San Diego, CA provides Rare and Exotic cactus plants, indoor cactus plants, desert cactus plants. Our cacti have a high quality. We inspect every cactus before realization.

  Announce!!! 

I created a new page “New offers” only for my customers and people who want to be my cuastomer. In the page you find very good offer for new rare cactus seedling (some of them are rarity). 

The prices in this page are 20% to 30% less than on other pages in my website.

“New offers” is protected by password. No one can open it. 

If you like to see the offers, send me email to the address: mikglad@cox.net with Subject: "New offer" and I'll email you the Login information. It is not necessary to buy something.

If you want to get a Newsletter ons a month email me with Subject: "All about cacti"

I will renew the page when I have new species for sale. So, time to time you can open the page and see what is on sale.

I will use your email only for answer your questions. 

 If you do not want more to receive my emails, reply adding to the existing Subject word Unsubscribe.   

Cacti for Sale, Best Prices. Rare and exotic cactus plants for sale. Rare Cactus plants for sale We have desert cactus plants, indoor cactus plants high quality.

Mammillaria nejapensis is one of the Mammillaria commonly called "Owl Eye Cactus", known for dichotomous branching (forking or dividing into two parts). Although dichotomous branching is not a common occurrence in cacti in general, it happens for some reason in this particular subspecies.  What is interesting about this cactus is that it began as a single head, and it has now divided twice, forming what will be four separate branches. When the division process started, it was obvious that four heads would appear, but I don’t think the one head divided quadruple. Most probably, one head became two, and then those two immediately divided.

Mammillaria nejapensis

Common Name(s): Silver Arrows.

It forms globular stems with silvery white spines with black tips up to 2" in length, and dense wool at the areoles. After a year the head of plant divided, than every heads divided again. Do you imagine how unusual will be this cactus?


 Mammillaria nejapensis Ø8 cm $5.00

 Common Name(s): Silver Arrows. It forms globular stems with silvery white spines with black tips up to 2" in length, and dense wool at the areoles. After a year the head of plant divided, than every heads divided again.

Out of stock

 Mammillaria nejapensis Ø8 cm grafted $5.00

 

 Common Name(s): Silver Arrows. It forms globular stems with silvery white spines with black tips up to 2" in length, and dense wool at the areoles. After a year the head of plant divided, than every heads divided again. This plant have very long spines

Out of stock

Below is description of Mammillaria nejapensis 

Family: Cactaseae

Scientific Name: Mammillaria nejapensis R. T. Craig & Dawson

Common Names:Silver Arrows, Royal Cross,  Owl Eyes

Origin: From Oaxaca city, towards Totalapan, in the NW area around Nejapa. (Rio Totolapan, San Pedro Totalapan-Mitla, Teotitlan, Las Animas, E of Miahuatlan, Los Cantiles, El Camaron-Mitla, San Cristobal, San Luis Amatalan- San Jose Lachiguri, Oaxaca-Tehuantepec)
Altitude 850 -
1.650 m.

Conservation Status: Listed in CITES appendix 2.

Description: This is one of the Mammillaria commonly called "Owl Eye Cactus", known for dichotomous branching (forking or dividing into two parts). Although dichotomous branching is not a common occurrence in cacti in general, it happens for some reason in this particular subspecies.  What is interesting about this cactus is that it began as a single head, and it has now divided twice, forming what will be four separate branches. When the division process started, it was obvious that four heads would appear, but I don’t think the one head divided quadruple. Most probably, one head became two, and then those two immediately divided.

The Mammillaria nejapensis forms globular stems with silvery white spines up to 2" in length, and dense wool at the areoles. Plant becomes slightly columnar to 6" in height. Each single stem begins to divide to form two stems to form large clusters.

Stem: Globose to short cylindrical, somewhat wider in the upper part, blue-green to dark green, to 15 cm high and 5 - 7.5 in diameter, with latex.  A cream coloured 'snowy' tomentum is present on the top of the plant.

Tubercles: Tubercles firm, pyramidal with the lacteal juice, arranged spirally with 13-21 parastichys

Axil: With much wool and many tortuous bristles

Spines:

Central (S): Absent.

Radial (S): Only 3 - 5, awl-like, straight to slightly curved, ivory with reddish-brown tips, becoming chalky white with age, the upper shorter, 2 - 5 mm long, the lowermost the longest, to 25 or even 50 mm (or more) long.

Flowers: Diurnal, funnel-form, 18 mm long, 10 mm in diameter, Flowers are pale yellow with reddish mid-stripe on each petal. Blooms adorn the crown of the plant, usually in a ring, in the growth of the previous year.

Bloom Time: Spring to summer.

Fruits: Bright or clear red elongated and quite attractive.

Sun Exposure: Prefers bright light with ample airflow.

 Water Needs: Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. We suggest watering these plants only from time to time, but we must remember to wet the soil deeply using 1-2 glasses of water every 4-5 weeks. Succulent plants can also endure long periods of time without watering; usually as the climate gets colder they need less water, while during the summer months they should be watered abundantly.

 

Cultivation: For a balanced development, it is best to position the Mammillaria nejapensis in a place where it is exposed to at least a few hours of direct sunlight. The Mammillaria nejapensis needs a minimum temperature superior to 15°C, during this time of the year it is best to check the night temperatures before setting it outside. A great part of succulent plants can endure low temperatures, even below 5°C, but if we’re growing them in a harsh climate we must avoid watering.

The spring weather, with a high temperature swing between the day and night hours, and pretty frequent rains, can favor the development of fungus diseases, which should be treated pre-emotively with a systemic fungicide, to use before the gems grow excessively; at the end of the winter we also suggest a wide range insecticide to prevent the attack of aphids and cochineals. We should always remember to do these treatments when there aren't flowerings in the garden.

 

It is easy to cultivate and make interesting specimens for any collection, and over time (in 12-15 years) it will form enormous colonies up to 50 cm or more in diameter!  It grows by dichotomously dividing, and also by producing offsets, and doesn't require any special treatment, except for the need for frequent transplanting, in order to manage its exuberance.  It needs as much light as possible without burning the plant, to keep the stems compact.  Provide a well-drained soil mix.  Water well and then allow to dry thoroughly before watering again during the growing season. It ddoesn’t like much, if any, winter water, but can survive short exposures to freezing temperatures (-4° C.) if properly hardened off and kept dry. (http://www.cactus-art.biz/schede/MAMMILLARIA/).

Soil requirements: Requires excellent drainage from porous cactus soil. These plants need to be located in an accentuated and drained substratum. We suggest repotting every 2-3 years.

Soil pH requirements:

Fertilizing: During the beautiful season it’s good to enrich the soil of our succulent plants; we advise using a fertilizer rich in potassium and phosphorous, but poor in nitrogen, because this chemical element doesn’t help the development of succulent plants, making them too soft and full of water, in this case the plant lose resistance to diseases. (http://www.gardening.eu/plants)

Frost Tolerance: Protect from frost.

Propagation Methods: Mammillaria nejapensis is best propagated from seed. Seed readily germinates at 20°-22°C, or by offsets if available.

Make a Free Website with Yola.